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There’s no doubt that distracted driving is responsible for many car accidents.  Everything from texting, changing the entertainment source on the car radio, trying to calm a frazzled toddler, or even enjoying a sip of that drink from the drive-through lane can take a driver’s attention from where it belongs — on surrounding traffic and safely operating a car.  AAA’s Foundation for Traffic Safety suggests that each year 5,000 fatal car crashes can be attributed to driver distraction.

Now it seems that automobile insurance giant, Allstate, wants to peak over your shoulder and into your car to see whether you are driving while distracted.  And Allstate isn’t watching just because you have insurance with that company, Allstate may be tracking your driving behavior from sensors on the vehicle next to you or behind you in traffic.  Continue reading

As a Social Security disability attorney with Rubin Guttman & Associates, I sometimes hear frustrated clients report that a neighbor, a distant relative, or an acquaintance is collecting disability benefits from a phony claim.  Maybe the “disabled” person claims serious back injuries and chronic pain but is seen doing heavy yard work.  Other times I hear about people who are addicts or just unwilling to work like the rest of us.  Still other supposedly disabled individuals are described as double dipping  —  they collect disability benefits while working nearly full time or under the table!  The underlying feeling is, “it’s just not fair.”  And our clients are right, it’s not fair for a person who is not entitled to Social Security disability benefits to defraud the government and collect benefits.  Help may be on the way.

According to an October article in The Fiscal Times, Congress is moving forward to enact laws which will crack down on Social Security disability fraud.  The new laws include strong criminal and civil penalties for violators.  The proposed laws could impact the roughly 11 million disabled beneficiaries of the Social Security disability program.  Continue reading

According to the Ohio Department of Insurance Guide to Automobile Insurance, automobile liability insurance (which pays the other party if you are at fault) may only cover the “named insured” under the policy or coverage may extend to family members who are resident in your household. The question of whether the insurance will follow the driver to another vehicle may depend on whether that car is a substitute for your car which is identified in the policy. Whether that substitute car is available for your regular use, may well determine whether you are insured when you drive it. If it is and it is not listed on your policy, then you may not be covered while driving that car. But if it is a car which you are only able to use by borrowing it from someone else or it is a rental, then your liability insurance should protect you in the event of an accident .

If you borrow a car for an extended period of time because your car cannot be driven due to mechanical issues, then your friend’s car may qualify as a substitute and you will be covered under the policy.

People are often surprised and disappointed to learn that under Ohio law an insurance company may sell you a liability policy which does not apply if you accidentally cause injury to another member of your family. Continue reading